Game Review: Buriedbornes

Ah.. The sweet and lovely time of gaming. Paired with some cup of tea and a nice delightful evening sun. Those times are always the best and with a friend or two (or none, I like it quiet), you can probably take it as a memorable day for the month.

Not really if the game is like this.

Story

The story goes off similar to what you might find in Dark Souls series. An Ancient Overlord has arisen from its grave, causing panic to the kingdoms throughout the land, so much so that they signed a peace treaty to stop wars and deal with the Overlord. However, with the appearance “Buriedbornes”, the army that can resurrect themselves back from the dead, the kingdoms failed in their effort and the world fell into despair.

And now the only thing left is these Buriedbornes, and yes, they are still a corpse in that regards which still doesn’t leave out that similarities between the game and Dark Souls. I don’t know why the Japanese likes this trope very much, I think it’s just a mere coincidence. I think.

Gameplay

Buriedbornes can be called a “diabolic” child of Dark Souls and old days RPG. Just by looking at the game art style and graphic instantly kicks off the fond memory of me dying over and over and over again at Dark Souls. This game is no different, but this time with less “Shield up! Dodge, roll, dodge, parry!” and more “What move should I pick next….”

The game starts in a familiar manner, you are introduced to a character creation screen, pick a name, pick a class (which is called “Job” in this game), get some starter items, and kick the gear to start. There are several things you should note in the character creation though, specifically, the class. You might think that these are all pay-to-win characters, but apparently, that wasn’t the case. I technically “unlocked” the Dark Elf class just by following the Dark Elf storyline. So I hope it’s all the same for other class

The game works in a very simple way. You have these sets of move and item (or just move if you wasted your items), when it’s your turn, you have the rights to blast off the enemy or heal yourself. As simple as that, yet it’s absurdly hard for new players to play without spamming whatever-attack-move-they-have. In my one or two hours of playing, I find myself erratically pressing “Attack” and “Guard”. For a while, it works very smoothly, I got to level 12 and then I died not due to an NPC, but due to another player with proper strategy.

You hear me right, this game has exactly the same matchmaking component ala Dark Souls. You encounter another player at a seemingly random rate, though I do take notice that it mostly happens when you go to a room with a corpse. Other players that are more knowledgeable than me, who is a new player, easily beats me with just a dazzling five moves. That’s right, five move from an underleveled player is enough to knock me down.

The game dread doesn’t come too much from the enemy NPC as much as it is from other player. The enemy NPCs are generally very easy to guess, you only need to do several damage reduction and all goes well. There are, of course, bosses to spice up that formula, but they generally sticks the same even to bosses.

Moving on to another mechanism I find interesting is the randomized loot stats. You can have a bad loot but you can try to “reroll” its random stats and if you’re lucky enough that RNG is on your side, you may get a superior and awesome loot. This makes looting a bit of a challenge too, due to the fact that the newer item you have looted may or may not have inferior stats to your currently equipped item. Loot can also give you various other things such as spell or moves, and you can swap out any existing spells or moves to the new one you found. Or don’t, that’s also a choice.

 

Traversing through rooms can be done by selecting either left or right room, one of them is bound to lead into something. Either a corpse or a boss, what you’ll deal with is highlighted, so be sure to check before entering any scary dark rooms! Sometimes the room far ahead can be seen and sometimes they don’t, though the game succinctly said that the room ahead is dark and you can’t see it, so yeah, makes sense.

Graphic

I don’t need to say much, the game simplistic approach to its user interface is enough to explain everything. The game doesn’t have that many fancy animation and most attacks are visualized through texts. There are however, some unique artworks of the enemy and classes, they’re hand-drawn and are definitely a nice looking sight for me.

Other than that, you’re pretty much staring at a monochromic user interface most of the times with black background all the times (hooray for AMOLED battery saving!).

Conclusion

Hellish. In a good way. I love the way that the game can be adrenaline-inducing at times, the pace and the strategy can kick in when the moment begins, and then you’re on your own. The game is what I would call “hardcore RPG” (just like it labels itself with), it’s hard and it has a weighty challenge from players and NPC alike, definitely not something you want to just ignore lightly in terms of gameplay.

I recommend the game to all the players that like challenge, or has seen or completed Dark Souls in a way. Sure, it doesn’t have the rapid-paced action of Dark Souls, but you can simply pass the game off as a game that carries the spiritual philosophy of Dark Souls.

Before closing, I have to tell that the game is in a rather bad translation state right now, you may want to shut down your internal spellchecking for a moment and just enjoy the game as is if you want to play it.

The game is of course available for Android at Play Store and iOS at Apple App Store, all for free with in-app purchase at a sane amount.

Yes, I’m bad at the game. That’s for definite sure.
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